Guest post: Yoga nidra, yoga to sleep by and 5 reasons to try it

After the success of her first guest post on restorative yoga, my wonderful friend, and awesome yoga teacher, Paula Hines returns with her second guest post about yoga nidra. If you want to reduce tension and anxiety, feel truly relaxed and get a better night’s sleep – this could be the yoga practice for you. Enjoy reading, and thank you, Paula, for another brilliant post.

What is Yoga Nidra?

The word ‘nidra’ translates as ‘sleep’, hence yoga nidra also being known as ‘yogic sleep’. Put simply, yoga nidra can be described as a form of meditation, though it is not so much a technique as a state of being. It can be seen as an altered state of consciousness – neither being asleep or awake, but a state in-between. Sometimes, yoga nidra is also referred to as ‘conscious sleep’ as the physical body is resting, but the mind remains awake – sleep with a trace of awareness.

The reported benefits of yoga nidra are numerous from reducing stress to even helping to heal emotional and physiological wounds (the work of Richard Miller with US Army veterans with PTSD has produced impressive results). Here are just a few reasons to try this practice for yourself:

 1.    Almost anyone can do it

This one of the great beauties yoga nidra. As a practitioner, all that is required of you is to lie down in a comfortable position, listen to the voice guiding you (either in a ‘live’ class or a recording) and be willing to become effortless, or in other words, enter an effortless state of being. Restorative yoga poses such as Supported Corpse Pose (Savasana), as pictured, or Supported Reclining Cobbler’s Pose are ideal positions for yoga nidra as the body is completely supported and comfortable, thus creating the conditions for both body and mind to let go more easily.

 2.    It’s an accessible route to meditation

If you are interested in developing a meditation practice but the idea of traditional seated meditation feels like a bit of a leap, then yoga nidra is an accessible route into cultivating a regular meditation practice. As yoga nidra is always guided and you are usually lying down, you needn’t focus on anything but the voice you are listening to. Also, as a yoga nidra can be as short as five minutes or as long as an hour, you can choose the length of practice to fit into your day. 

3.    It promotes deep relaxation

Yoga nidra brings about total physical, emotional and mental relaxation. When we are asleep we lose our sense of who we are (the self), yet our minds are still not truly relaxed. The space we inhabit between being asleep and awake in yoga nidra, as well as our comfortable position facilitate deep rest. That said, even if you do fall asleep during your yoga nidra practice, you will still benefit as your subconscious mind will still take in all it needs.

If you are feeling fatigued, then listening to a yoga nidra can be rejuvenating. For instance, if you feel like you need an afternoon nap, try lying down and listening to a yoga nidra. Don’t be surprised to feel refreshed afterwards.

4.    It can help improve sleep quality

When I suffered with insomnia, I found that listening to a 10-minute yoga nidra recording in bed each night not only helped me get to sleep but also, the quality of the sleep I did have was notably improved. If listening to a yoga nidra at bedtime happens to suit you, this can be a great way to begin developing a daily practice.

5.    It can help bring about greater sense of wellbeing

Yoga nidras often invite the space to set a Sankalpa (or heartfelt intention) – a positive statement in the present tense such as, ‘I am whole and healthy,” or “I am enough as I am’. A Sankalpa is not essential, though for my own personal experience of yoga nidra, practising with a Sankalpa, has helped (and continues to help) me find self-acceptance. As Rod Stryker (teacher, founder of ParaYoga and author of The Four Desires) describes, yoga nidra,  “…opens a doorway to a place where we can see ourselves and our lives in the most positive light.

As a student I have experienced yoga nidras across a range of traditions – Himalayan, Satyananda and iRest (Richard Miller) – and experienced different benefits from all of them, and so when I wanted to deepen my studies in this area in order to share yoga nidra with more people, I trained with Uma Dinsmore-Tuli, Nirlipta Tuil and Ben Woolf in Total Yoga Nidra. Total Yoga Nidra delves into all these different lineages and shows us that there is no one ‘right way’ to practise yoga nidra.

If you have classes available in your area then it can be wonderful to experience live ‘in person’ yoga nidra, but you can also listen to recordings meaning that you can access yoga nidra whenever you need it at the times which work best for you.

I have recorded short 10-15 minute practices which are available through my website here. I will be regularly adding more yoga nidra and guided meditation recordings to this page.

I hope this has encouraged you to give yoga nidra a try and to experience its benefits for yourself.

Nidra by Paula Hines (U Can Yoga)

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29 Comments

  1. Hello Tooting, I love yoga practise. These helps me a lot to stay fit and feel fresh whole day. It keeps my mind calm. It is very important part of my routine. You have described a awesome points about yoga. I like your blog. Thanks for update me latest tips about it.

  2. I’ve attended yoga classes last year and they were really good. I’ve never tried yoga nidra and I think I will try it now because I need something that will reduce tension and help me improve my sleep. Are the results better if it’s combined with regular yoga? Angel
    Angel recently posted…Best Sleep MasksMy Profile

    • Yoga Nidra sounds amazing, if you have any questions do ask Paula she’s be happy to answer them. Thanks for your comment. x

    • I know it sounds an amazing form of yoga. I’m permanently in that state of waking and sleep – it’s just permanent exhaustion for me!

    • That’s sounds like the perfect time to practice a bit of yoga nidra.

    • Thank you, I hope you do give it a try, I’m sure you’d love it, and get a great night’s sleep too!

  3. I was only thinking about yoga yesterday. I used to do a lot of yoga many years ago and loved it, I found it a good way to clear my mind. Really should look for another local group and get back into it x

    • I think this sounds like an amazing form of yoga to do when one is particularly stressed, in need of a good night’s sleep or just to get some me time. Hope you get back into yoga soon.

    • If it wasn’t for running I’d be a sloth too. This kind of yoga looks pretty good, though! You need to find your yoga groove again!

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